Hiker Feet

On the first day I was already developing blisters on the bottom of both feet, near my toes. By week two my blisters had blisters.

To varying degrees, blisters are a common occurrence on the PCT.

Hikers have their own tricks and superstitions about blisters because actual prevention is a rarity.

Some hikers will double sock each foot, or use a sock liner inside their favorite pair. Many hikers will spend the months before the hike breaking in multiple pairs of shoes for the trail (the average pair allegedly lasts 700 miles), the vast majority of shoes out here being tennis shoe esque trailer runners.

Most hikers will throw some tape on a hotspot when they feel a blister looming.

And almost all hikers will take some time during the day with their shoes off, air drying their feet.

When the blisters arrive, use a pin to drain away the pain. Some will even tie thread through the blisters to continue the drainage while they sleep or even walk.

In all I've only met a handful of hikers without any blister issues.

Now after three weeks, I feel I've personally turned the corner on blisters. 

My feet have toughened up and when the blisters start to come back I'll be ready.

 

 My feet after a week

My feet after a week

 My feet after three weeks

My feet after three weeks

 Stepping over mountian runoff 

Stepping over mountian runoff 

 Whitewater Preserve, CA

Whitewater Preserve, CA